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April 8, 2014

Vegans Have Similar Omega-3 Levels to Omnivores and Respond Well to Supplements

Filed under: Omega-3 — Sarah @ 3:51 pm
Sarah
Sarah McGowan-Freije, NatureCity author & contributor

Despite the fact that vegans don’t eat fish, a recent study suggests that their omega-3 index is no lower than that of the average omnivore. A second study using the same cohort also found that vegans responded well to non-fish based omega-3 supplements.

The omega-3 index is a measure of omega-3 levels in red blood cells and is a reflection of a person’s long-term intake of DHA and DPA. It is an indicator of the risk level of death by a cardiovascular event.

For the first part of the study, researchers compared the omega-3 index of 165 vegans to those of omnivorous American soldiers eating army rations. They found that the vegans had an average omega-3 index of 3.7% and the soldiers had an average index of 3.5%.

The researchers also noted that some of the vegans had omega-3 levels as high as 8% and that the women had higher levels than the men. The results were also linked to age.

For the second study, 46 of the original 165 vegans were given a daily vegan omega3 supplement containing 243 mg dose of EPA plus DHA over the course of 4 months. At the end of that time period, the researchers recorded an increase in the average omega-3 index from 3.1% to 4.8%.

Researchers from the University of San Diego, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University of South Dakota, and OmegaQuant Analytics conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on March 17, 2014, in Clinical Nutrition.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, better moods, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s. For vegans like the ones in this study or for folks who just don’t like fish, consider taking a daily high quality non-fish supplement that has been tested for purity and potency.



April 4, 2014

Omega-3s May Reduce Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in People With No CVD History

Filed under: Omega-3 — Sarah @ 3:42 pm
Sarah
Sarah McGowan-Freije, NatureCity author & contributor

A recent study suggests that while omega-3s may not affect cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in mature adults with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), it does reduce the risk of CVD in adults with no history of hypertension or CVD.

Participants in the study included 4,203 mostly white, married, highly educated people with a median age of 74. They participated in one of four interventions:

1. 650 mg of EPA omega-3s and 350 mg of DHA omega-3s;

2. 10 mg of lutein and 2 mg of zeaxanthin;

3. a combination of omega-3s and lutein and zeaxanthin;

4. a placebo.

At the conclusion of the study, no statistically significant reductions in CVD risk were observed for any of the groups. However, when the researchers examined people with no history of hypertension, they found that there was a 34% reduction in risk of CVD and for those with no history of CVD there was a 19% reduction.

Researchers from the AREDS2 Research Group conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on March 17, 2014 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, better moods, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s.



March 25, 2014

Omega-3 Consumption Associated with Lower Blood Pressure

Filed under: Omega-3 — Emma @ 10:06 pm
Emma
Emma McGowan NatureCity author & contributor

High blood pressure greatly increases the risk of an adverse cardiovascular event. A recent study suggests that taking an omega-3 supplement or eating omega-3-rich foods may be as effective for lowering blood pressure as making lifestyle changes such as reducing sodium intake or alcohol or increasing exercise.

The researchers examined data from 70 clinical trials and found that consumption of omega-3s resulted in an average reduction of 1.52 mmHg in systolic blood pressure and 0.99 mmHg in diastolic blood pressure. In individuals with normal blood pressure, reductions of 1.25 mmHg in systolic blood pressure and 0.62 mmHg in diastolic blood pressure were observed.

Untreated hypertensive participants had even greater reductions of 4.51 mmHg in systolic blood pressure and 3.05 mmHg in diastolic blood pressure.

Previous studies have shown that dietary sodium reduction is associated with a 3.6 mmHg reduction in systolic blood pressure, physical activity with a 4.6 mmHG reduction, and cutting out alcohol with a 3.8 mmHg reduction.

Each 2 mmHg reduction in blood pressure reduces stroke mortality by 6%, coronary heart disease mortality by 4% and total mortality by 3%. Additionally, a 1.25 mmHg reduction in systolic blood pressure could prevent a pre-hypertensive person from becoming hypertensive.

Researchers from Exponent Inc. and Van Elswyck Consulting, Inc., conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on March 6, 2104, in American Journal of Hypertension.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including alleviating arthritis pain, better moods, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.
Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s.



March 21, 2014

Omega-3s May Improve Cognitive Function of Malnourished Children

Filed under: Omega-3 — Sarah @ 6:38 pm
Sarah
Sarah McGowan-Freije, NatureCity author & contributor

Malnourishment – especially in children – is linked with impaired mental functioning. A recent study suggests that supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids may improve a range of cognitive measures in malnourished children.

Participants in the study included 50 malnourished 8 to 12 year old children who took either an omega-3 supplement containing 180 mg of DHA and 270 mg of EPA omega-3s or a placebo daily for three months. Neuropsychological performance was measured at the beginning of the study and after 3 months of supplmentation.

At the conclusion of the study, more than 50% of the omega-3 group showed improvement in 11 of the 18 neuropsychological variables studied. The researchers noted that coordination, processing speed, attention, perceptual integration, and executive function were improved in more than 70% of the omega-3 group.

Although the study participants were Mexican children, the researchers pointed out that the results have implications for the US as well. 14.% of households in the US were designated “food insecure” at some point in 2012 and 5.7% were “very food insecure” according to the US Department of Agriculture.

Researchers from the Autonomous University of Ciudad Juarez in Mexico, the University of Granada in Spain and the University of North Carolina conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on February 6, 2014, in Research in Developmental Disabilities.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including alleviating arthritis pain, better moods, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s.



March 17, 2014

Higher Omega-3 Intake Linked With Lower Incidence Of Heart Disease

Filed under: Omega-3 — Sarah @ 5:24 pm
Sarah
Sarah McGowan-Freije, NatureCity author & contributor

Japanese people consume on average nearly 100 grams of fish daily. Americans tend to consume between 7 and 13 grams per day, which is equivalent to approximately one serving per week. A recent study found that higher omega-3 consumption may significantly lower the risk of artery calcification and heart disease.

Participants in the study included approximately 300 men who were followed for five years. During this time, lifestyle factors that affect cardiovascular health (such as cigarette smoking, cholesterol levels, alcohol consumption, diabetes, and high blood pressure) were tracked.

The researchers found that the American men had more than three times the incidence of coronary artery calcification compared to the Japanese men, even after adjusting for other heart disease risk factors.

Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print in the Journal Heart on December 18, 2013.
Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including alleviating arthritis pain, better moods, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s.



March 6, 2014

Omega-3s May Restore Neural Pathways In Alzheimer’s Patients

Filed under: Omega-3 — Emma @ 7:52 pm
Emma
Emma McGowan NatureCity author & contributor

A recent study suggests that supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids may help slow down and potentially reverse the progression of Alzheimer’s disease by stimulating the repair of cells damaged by inflammation.

The body’s normal response to inflammation is the repair of tissue through a process known as restoration. When restoration does not take place, chronic inflammation may occur. Chronic inflammation is frequently observed in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease.

Participants in the study included 15 individuals with Alzheimer’s disease, 20 with mild cognitive impairment, and 21 controls. The researchers measured the cerebrospinal fluid from those participants as well as brain tissue from 10 Alzheimer’s patients and 10 control subjects.

They examined the samples for indicators of inflammation and receptors involved in the resolution pathway and found that there was, in fact, a resolution pathway in the brain. In Alzheimer’s disease patients, that pathway was disrupted.

Previous research suggests that omega-3 supplementation is a valid way to induce the resolution process and stimulate the uptake of amyloid-beta proteins that have been linked to the development of Alzheimer’s disease.

Researchers from the Karolinska Institut in Sweden conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on February 14, 2014, in The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including alleviating arthritis pain, better moods, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s.



February 24, 2014

EPA-Rich Supplements Shown to Boost Brain Performance Better than DHA-Rich Supplements

Filed under: Omega-3 — Emma @ 8:32 pm
Emma
Emma McGowan NatureCity author & contributor

There are two types of omega-3 fatty acids that come from fish: EPA and DHA. A recent study found that supplements rich in EPA may be more effective than supplements rich in DHA at improving cognitive performance without the brain having to work harder.

Participants in the study included 13 people with an average age of 24. They were given either an EPA-rich supplement or a DHA-rich supplement for 30 days, followed by a 30-day washout period before switching interventions.

The researchers measured brain activity using MRI scans and found that EPA was associated with improved performance in the area of the brain that controls rational cognitive functions such as decision making, reward anticipation, and impulse control. It was also associated with better activation in the part of the brain that controls corrective strategies and reductions in reaction times (precentrel gyrus).

The MRI scans also showed a reduction in neural activity during EPA supplementation, indicating that the brain was not working as hard, despite the increased performance.

The DHA supplement was also found to be associated with improvements in the precentrel gyrus but there was no improvement seen in cognitive function. Additionally, there was an increase in neural activity.

Researchers from Swinburne University conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on January 28, 2014, in Human Psychopharmacology: Clinical & Experimental.

Omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, so it is especially important to ensure they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in DHA and EPA omega-3s.

If you don’t like fish or you’re worried about the high mercury levels found in some fish, consider taking a daily high quality supplement that has been tested for purity and potency.



February 12, 2014

Omega-3s Combined With Alpha Lipoic Acid May Slow Progression of Alzheimer’s

Filed under: Omega-3 — Emma @ 6:54 pm
Emma
Emma McGowan NatureCity author & contributor

Alzheimer’s disease is a debilitating illness that tends to occur later in life, causing memory loss and cognitive decline. A recent study suggests that taking a supplement containing omega-3 fatty acids and alpha lipoic acid (LA) may slow the progression of cognitive and functional decline associated with Alzheimer’s.

Participants in the study included 32 individuals with Alzheimer’s. Over the course of one year they were given one of three interventions:

1. a placebo;

2. omega-3 fatty acids;

3. omega-3 fatty acids plus LA.

The researchers measured biomarkers of oxidative stress as well as performance on the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Activities of Daily Living/Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (ADL/IADL), and Alzheimer Disease Assessment Scale-cognitive subscale (ADAS-Cog).

They found that supplementation with the omega-3 fatty acids and LA did not affect oxidative stress markers and that omega-3s with or without LA did not affect the results of the ADAS-Cog nor the ADL.

However, the omega-3 and LA combination was associated with a slower decline in MMSE and IADL while the omega-3s alone were associated with slower decline in IADL, when compared with the placebo.

Researchers from Oregon Health & Science University conducted the study. It was published in the January 2014 issue of the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease.
Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including alleviating arthritis pain, improved mood, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s.

Alpha-lipoic acid is an antioxidant that previous studies have linked with improvements in symptoms of diabetes. It can be found in yeast, liver, kidney, spinach, broccoli, and potatoes.



January 30, 2014

Association Found Between Omega-3s and Reduced Risk of Type-2 Diabetes

Filed under: Omega-3 — Sarah @ 6:46 pm
Sarah
Sarah McGowan-Freije, NatureCity author & contributor

Type-2 diabetes usually occurs later in life and is often tied to lifestyle factors such as poor dietary choices and lack of exercise. A recent study out of Finland found that having high blood levels of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids may lower the risk of developing type-2 diabetes by up to a third.

Participants in the study included 2,212 Finnish men between the ages of 42 and 60 who participated in the Kuopio Ischemic Heart Disease Risk Factor study.

The participants were followed for an average of 19.3 years, and during that time 422 were diagnosed with type-2 diabetes. After analyzing the data, the researchers found that the men with the highest blood levels of EPA, DPA, and DHA were 33% less likely to have developed type-2 diabetes than those with the lowest levels.

The researchers did not, however, find any statistically significant association between serum or dietary ALA, dietary fish, or EPA plus DHA and the risk of type-2 diabetes.

Researchers from the University of Eastern Finland conducted the study. It was published in the January 2014 issue of Diabetes Care.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including alleviating arthritis pain, improved mood, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s.



January 27, 2014

Omega-3s May Help Preserve Brain Size, Memory In Later Years

Filed under: Omega-3 — Sarah @ 10:02 pm
Sarah
Sarah McGowan-Freije, NatureCity author & contributor

Our brains are like many muscles in our bodies in that they shrink as we age, affecting functions such as memory and movement. A recent study found that higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids may be correlated with larger brain volumes in later years.

Participants in the study included 1,111 women who took part in the Women’s Health Initiative Memory Study. The researchers measured levels of EPA and DHA omega-3 fatty-acids in their blood and also measured brain volumes using MRI. Brain volumes were measured again eight years later when the women were an average age of 78.

The researchers found that participants with a higher amount of omega-3s (7.5%) in the blood stream had brain volumes that were 2.1 cm3 larger in volume (or 0.7%) than participants with lower levels of omega-3s (3.4%).

They also found that the hippocampus, the area of the brain that plays an important part in memory, was 2.7% larger in the individuals with higher levels of omega-3s

Researchers from the University of South Dakota conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on January 22, 2014, in the journal Neurology.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including alleviating arthritis pain, better moods, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s.



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