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July 24, 2014

Fish Oil May Slow Brain Shrinkage and Cognitive Decline

Filed under: Omega-3 — Emma @ 1:12 pm
Emma
Emma McGowan NatureCity author & contributor

People who are not genetically predisposed to Alzheimer’s disease may be able to conserve brain volume. A recent study suggests that taking fish oil supplements may prompt structural changes in the brain that conserve brain volume and improve cognition.

Participants in the study included 819 people who took part in the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Of those participants, 229 were cognitively normal, 397 had mild cognitive impairment, and 193 had Alzheimer’s disease. Additionally, 117 of the participants reported regular fish oil supplement use.

The researchers conducted neuropsychological tests and brain MRIs every six months. They also compared cognitive functioning and brain atrophy for patients who reported taking fish oil supplements and those not taking fish oil supplements.

They found that taking a fish oil supplement was associated with better cognitive functioning during the duration of the study. That result was only seen for those participants with normal baseline cognitive function and for people who tested negative for AP0E4, the gene associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

Additionally, the participants who were APOE4 negative and took fish oil supplements had less brain atrophy than those who did not take fish oil.

Researchers from Brown University and Rhode Island Hospital conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on June 18, 2014, in the journal Alzheimer’s & Dementia.

Fish oil has also been linked to numerous other health benefits, including combating diabetes, lowering cholesterol, improving vision,reducing the risk of dementia and relieving depression.

If you’re looking to increase your fish oil intake, try adding darker fish, such as salmon or tuna, to your diet. If you don’t like the taste of fish or are just finding it hard to work it into your meal plans, consider taking a high quality supplement. Make sure your supplement is tested for purity and potency.



June 4, 2014

Omega-3s May Cut Risk of Venous Thromboembolism in Half

Filed under: Omega-3 — Emma @ 2:20 pm
Emma
Emma McGowan NatureCity author & contributor

Venous thromboembolism is a potentially deadly condition that occurs when a blood clot breaks loose and travels in the blood towards the lungs. A recent study suggests that consuming a combination of fish and fish oil supplements may lower the risk of venous thromboembolism by almost 50%.

Participants in the study included 23,621 people between the ages of 25 and 97 who were part of the Tromso population-based cohort. The researchers collected data over the course of an average 16 years, during which time 536 cases of venous thromboembolism were reported.

After analyzing the data, the researchers determined that participants who consumed three or more servings of fish per week had a 22% reduction in the risk of venous thromboembolism compared to those who consumed between 1 and 1.9 servings weekly.

When the participants who consumed three or more servings weekly also took fish oil supplements, the risk was 48% lower risk than those who ate 1 to 1.9 servings of fish weekly and did not take a fish oil supplement.

Researchers from the University of Tromso in Norway conducted the study. It was published in the June 2014 issue of The Journal of Nutrition.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, better moods, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s. For vegans like the ones in this study or for folks who just don’t like fish, consider taking a daily high quality non-fish supplement that has been tested for purity and potency.



May 7, 2014

Supplement May Help Ease PMS Symptoms

Filed under: Omega-3 — Emma @ 9:00 am
Emma
Emma McGowan NatureCity author & contributor

Women suffering every month from premenstrual syndrome may now find relief in a krill oil supplement. A recent study suggests that a supplement of krill oil, vitamins B1, B2, B6, soy isoflavones, and rosemary extract may significantly reduce symptoms of PMS.

Participants in the study included 29 women who took a daily supplement containing the above listed nutrients for three months. Symptoms decreased as the trial progressed, and the researchers noted maximum benefit from the supplement at the end of the research period.

Specific results included a decrease in overall anxiety by 70%, bloating by 69%, breast tenderness by 81%, skin outbreaks by 69%, cravings by 59%, fatigue by 60%, forgetfulness by 77%, insomnia by 62% and headaches by 70%.

PMS symptoms returned after the supplementation period was over.

Researchers from the School of Cancer Sciences at the University of Birmingham and Lifespan Essential Ltd. conducted the study. It was published on September 27, 2013, in Nutrition and Dietary Supplements.

Krill oil is rich in omega-3s, which have been linked to improved joint mobility, aiding your immune system, and helping with age-related macular degeneration. B vitamins have also been linked to numerous health benefits, including reducing breast cancer risk, nervous system function, red blood cell formation, and hormone function. Studies have also suggested that B vitamins may reduce the risk of hearing loss, and birth defects

Soy isoflavones may result in the widening of blood vessels and improvement in artery function. Additionally, soy isoflavones have been associated with reduced menopause symptoms, reduced bone loss, decreased risk of prostate cancer, improved bone health, cancer prevention and slowing down the aging process.



April 24, 2014

Echium Oil May Help Boost Omega-3 Blood Levels

Filed under: Omega-3 — Emma @ 5:00 pm
Emma
Emma McGowan NatureCity author & contributor

Vegetarians and vegans often do not get enough omega-3 fatty acids in their diet. A recent study suggests that taking a daily supplement of echium oil (a good source of stearidonic acid or SDA) may increase blood levels of both DHA and EPA omega-3s.

SDA is an intermediate omega-3 fatty acid that aids in the conversion of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) into EPA, which is the omega-3 fatty acid found in fish.

Participants in the study included 80 volunteers, 61 who were normal weight and 19 who were overweight and had metabolic syndrome. The normal weight volunteers were given either 1.9 grams of EPA in the form of fish oil or 2 grams of SDA (the equivalent of 17 grams of echium oil daily). The overweight participants were given only the echium supplements.

After eight weeks, the researchers found that the echium oil increased EPA levels by 168% and DPA blood levels by 68%. DHA levels, on the other hand, decreased by 5%. The EPA and DPA increases seen were 25% and 50% lower respectively than the increases seen with fish oil supplementation.

However, while the fish oil supplements were only associated with lower triglyceride levels, the echium oil group showed improvements in cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, oxidized LDL, and triglycerides. The echium oil group also saw decreases in HDL cholesterol.

Researchers from Friedrich Schiller University conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on February 19, 2014, in The Journal of Nutrition.

Previous studies have linked echium oil with improved immunity and lower inflammation, as well as lower risk of a cardiac event. It is especially important for vegetarians and vegans, who don’t eat fish or eggs and therefore do not get enough essential EPA and DHA omega-3s through their diet.



April 8, 2014

Vegans Have Similar Omega-3 Levels to Omnivores and Respond Well to Supplements

Filed under: Omega-3 — Sarah @ 3:51 pm
Sarah
Sarah McGowan-Freije, NatureCity author & contributor

Despite the fact that vegans don’t eat fish, a recent study suggests that their omega-3 index is no lower than that of the average omnivore. A second study using the same cohort also found that vegans responded well to non-fish based omega-3 supplements.

The omega-3 index is a measure of omega-3 levels in red blood cells and is a reflection of a person’s long-term intake of DHA and DPA. It is an indicator of the risk level of death by a cardiovascular event.

For the first part of the study, researchers compared the omega-3 index of 165 vegans to those of omnivorous American soldiers eating army rations. They found that the vegans had an average omega-3 index of 3.7% and the soldiers had an average index of 3.5%.

The researchers also noted that some of the vegans had omega-3 levels as high as 8% and that the women had higher levels than the men. The results were also linked to age.

For the second study, 46 of the original 165 vegans were given a daily vegan omega3 supplement containing 243 mg dose of EPA plus DHA over the course of 4 months. At the end of that time period, the researchers recorded an increase in the average omega-3 index from 3.1% to 4.8%.

Researchers from the University of San Diego, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, the University of South Dakota, and OmegaQuant Analytics conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on March 17, 2014, in Clinical Nutrition.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, better moods, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s. For vegans like the ones in this study or for folks who just don’t like fish, consider taking a daily high quality non-fish supplement that has been tested for purity and potency.



April 4, 2014

Omega-3s May Reduce Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in People With No CVD History

Filed under: Omega-3 — Sarah @ 3:42 pm
Sarah
Sarah McGowan-Freije, NatureCity author & contributor

A recent study suggests that while omega-3s may not affect cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in mature adults with age-related macular degeneration (AMD), it does reduce the risk of CVD in adults with no history of hypertension or CVD.

Participants in the study included 4,203 mostly white, married, highly educated people with a median age of 74. They participated in one of four interventions:

1. 650 mg of EPA omega-3s and 350 mg of DHA omega-3s;

2. 10 mg of lutein and 2 mg of zeaxanthin;

3. a combination of omega-3s and lutein and zeaxanthin;

4. a placebo.

At the conclusion of the study, no statistically significant reductions in CVD risk were observed for any of the groups. However, when the researchers examined people with no history of hypertension, they found that there was a 34% reduction in risk of CVD and for those with no history of CVD there was a 19% reduction.

Researchers from the AREDS2 Research Group conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on March 17, 2014 in JAMA Internal Medicine.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, better moods, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s.



March 25, 2014

Omega-3 Consumption Associated with Lower Blood Pressure

Filed under: Omega-3 — Emma @ 10:06 pm
Emma
Emma McGowan NatureCity author & contributor

High blood pressure greatly increases the risk of an adverse cardiovascular event. A recent study suggests that taking an omega-3 supplement or eating omega-3-rich foods may be as effective for lowering blood pressure as making lifestyle changes such as reducing sodium intake or alcohol or increasing exercise.

The researchers examined data from 70 clinical trials and found that consumption of omega-3s resulted in an average reduction of 1.52 mmHg in systolic blood pressure and 0.99 mmHg in diastolic blood pressure. In individuals with normal blood pressure, reductions of 1.25 mmHg in systolic blood pressure and 0.62 mmHg in diastolic blood pressure were observed.

Untreated hypertensive participants had even greater reductions of 4.51 mmHg in systolic blood pressure and 3.05 mmHg in diastolic blood pressure.

Previous studies have shown that dietary sodium reduction is associated with a 3.6 mmHg reduction in systolic blood pressure, physical activity with a 4.6 mmHG reduction, and cutting out alcohol with a 3.8 mmHg reduction.

Each 2 mmHg reduction in blood pressure reduces stroke mortality by 6%, coronary heart disease mortality by 4% and total mortality by 3%. Additionally, a 1.25 mmHg reduction in systolic blood pressure could prevent a pre-hypertensive person from becoming hypertensive.

Researchers from Exponent Inc. and Van Elswyck Consulting, Inc., conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on March 6, 2104, in American Journal of Hypertension.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including alleviating arthritis pain, better moods, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.
Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s.



March 21, 2014

Omega-3s May Improve Cognitive Function of Malnourished Children

Filed under: Omega-3 — Sarah @ 6:38 pm
Sarah
Sarah McGowan-Freije, NatureCity author & contributor

Malnourishment – especially in children – is linked with impaired mental functioning. A recent study suggests that supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids may improve a range of cognitive measures in malnourished children.

Participants in the study included 50 malnourished 8 to 12 year old children who took either an omega-3 supplement containing 180 mg of DHA and 270 mg of EPA omega-3s or a placebo daily for three months. Neuropsychological performance was measured at the beginning of the study and after 3 months of supplmentation.

At the conclusion of the study, more than 50% of the omega-3 group showed improvement in 11 of the 18 neuropsychological variables studied. The researchers noted that coordination, processing speed, attention, perceptual integration, and executive function were improved in more than 70% of the omega-3 group.

Although the study participants were Mexican children, the researchers pointed out that the results have implications for the US as well. 14.% of households in the US were designated “food insecure” at some point in 2012 and 5.7% were “very food insecure” according to the US Department of Agriculture.

Researchers from the Autonomous University of Ciudad Juarez in Mexico, the University of Granada in Spain and the University of North Carolina conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on February 6, 2014, in Research in Developmental Disabilities.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including alleviating arthritis pain, better moods, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s.



March 17, 2014

Higher Omega-3 Intake Linked With Lower Incidence Of Heart Disease

Filed under: Omega-3 — Sarah @ 5:24 pm
Sarah
Sarah McGowan-Freije, NatureCity author & contributor

Japanese people consume on average nearly 100 grams of fish daily. Americans tend to consume between 7 and 13 grams per day, which is equivalent to approximately one serving per week. A recent study found that higher omega-3 consumption may significantly lower the risk of artery calcification and heart disease.

Participants in the study included approximately 300 men who were followed for five years. During this time, lifestyle factors that affect cardiovascular health (such as cigarette smoking, cholesterol levels, alcohol consumption, diabetes, and high blood pressure) were tracked.

The researchers found that the American men had more than three times the incidence of coronary artery calcification compared to the Japanese men, even after adjusting for other heart disease risk factors.

Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print in the Journal Heart on December 18, 2013.
Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including alleviating arthritis pain, better moods, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s.



March 6, 2014

Omega-3s May Restore Neural Pathways In Alzheimer’s Patients

Filed under: Omega-3 — Emma @ 7:52 pm
Emma
Emma McGowan NatureCity author & contributor

A recent study suggests that supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids may help slow down and potentially reverse the progression of Alzheimer’s disease by stimulating the repair of cells damaged by inflammation.

The body’s normal response to inflammation is the repair of tissue through a process known as restoration. When restoration does not take place, chronic inflammation may occur. Chronic inflammation is frequently observed in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s disease.

Participants in the study included 15 individuals with Alzheimer’s disease, 20 with mild cognitive impairment, and 21 controls. The researchers measured the cerebrospinal fluid from those participants as well as brain tissue from 10 Alzheimer’s patients and 10 control subjects.

They examined the samples for indicators of inflammation and receptors involved in the resolution pathway and found that there was, in fact, a resolution pathway in the brain. In Alzheimer’s disease patients, that pathway was disrupted.

Previous research suggests that omega-3 supplementation is a valid way to induce the resolution process and stimulate the uptake of amyloid-beta proteins that have been linked to the development of Alzheimer’s disease.

Researchers from the Karolinska Institut in Sweden conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on February 14, 2014, in The Journal of the Alzheimer’s Association.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including alleviating arthritis pain, better moods, improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s.



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