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September 22, 2014

Eating More Omega 3 Fatty Acids and Fish May Lower the Risk of Hearing Loss

Filed under: Omega-3 — Sarah @ 4:58 pm
Sarah
Sarah McGowan-Freije, NatureCity author & contributor

Hearing loss is a very common and often debilitating health problem that comes with aging. Researchers are beginning to identify potentially modifiable risk factors that may prevent or delay acquired hearing loss. A recent study suggests that eating two or more servings of fish per week may lower the risk of developing hearing loss in women.

Participants in the study included 65,215 women who took part in the Nurses’ Health Study II, which took place from 1991 to 2009 and had a total of 1,038,093 person-years of follow-up. Consumption of types of fish, long-chain omega-3 fatty acids and self-reported incidences of hearing loss were recorded. During the follow-up, 11,606 women developed hearing loss.

When researchers examined the correlation between fish consumption and hearing loss, they found that the women who consumed two or more servings per week were 20% less likely to develop hearing loss compared with those who rarely consumed fish.

The researchers also looked at consumption of specific types of fish and found that eating more of any type of fish was inversely associated with the risk of developing hearing loss. Additionally, higher consumption of long-chain omega-3 fatty acids was inversely associated with risk.

Researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on September 10, 2014, in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, better moods, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s. If you don’t like fish, consider taking a daily high quality non-fish supplement that has been tested for purity and potency.



September 16, 2014

Omega-3 Supplementation May Help Reduce Behavioral Problems in Children

Filed under: Omega-3 — Emma @ 3:53 pm
Emma
Emma McGowan NatureCity author & contributor

Behavioral issues such as aggression and anti-social behavior can be a huge problem for elementary-aged children, most often treated with therapy and prescription drugs. A recent study suggests that high-dose omega-3 supplementation could reduce anti-social behavior in children while also changing parental attitudes toward the children.

Participants in the study included 200 children between the ages of 8 and 16 with behavioral issues. Over the course of six months, half of the group was given a juice drink containing 1000 mg of omega-3s (300 mg DHA, 200 mg EPA, 400 mg ALA, and 100 mg DPA) while the other half was given a placebo.

Six months after the conclusion of the study, the researchers found a 41.6% reduction in parent-rated child externalized behavior problems. Additionally, a 68.4% reduction in childhood depression was observed.

The researchers also found that anti-social behavior on the part of the caregivers was reduced when the children were given omega-3s.

The researchers highlighted the fact that the changes were not observed immediately after the end of the six-month treatment period but rather six months later. They noted that more than half of the positive results – 60.9% – seen here were due to a change in the parents’ attitudes. They believe this change in parental attitude can be attributed to the fact that the children were easier to deal with, and put less stress on the parents.

Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on August 22, 2014, in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, better moods, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s. If you don’t like fish, consider taking a daily high quality non-fish supplement that has been tested for purity and potency.



September 8, 2014

Omega-3s Combined With Sterols May Help Reduce Cholesterol, Trigylcerides

Filed under: Omega-3 — Sarah @ 3:26 pm
Sarah
Sarah McGowan-Freije, NatureCity author & contributor

According to the WHO, approximately 40% of adults over the age of 25 worldwide have high triglyceride concentrations. A recent study suggests that taking low dose omega-3s in combination with plant sterols may reduce both cholesterol and triglyceride levels in people with high cholesterol. 

Participants in the study included 332 adults with high cholesterol. Over the course of four weeks, they were given 2.5 grams of sterols with varying levels of omega-3s (0, 0.9, 1.3, and 1.8 grams of EPA and DHA).

In the 314 people who completed the study, the researchers noted lower triglyceride levels that ranged from 9.3% to 16.2%, compared with the control group.  The participants that received the highest level of omega-3s had the biggest reduction. Additionally, LDL cholesterol levels were lowered by 11.5% and 14.7%, when compared with the control group.  These results were also dosage dependent.

Researchers from Unilever Research and Development in the Netherlands and Food Files in Sweden conducted the study. It was published on August 13, 2014, in The Journal of Nutrition.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, better moods, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s. For vegans like the ones in this study or for folks who just don’t like fish, consider taking a daily high quality non-fish supplement that has been tested for purity and potency.

Plant sterols have previously been shown to reduce cholesterol, sometimes by as much as 17%. They can be found in small quantities in fruits, vegetables, vegetable oils, nuts, seeds, cereals and legumes. There are also a number of foods that are fortified with plant sterols, such as spreads, mayonnaise, orange juice and granola bars.

Eating a balanced, healthy diet is a great way to protect your heart against cardiovascular heart disease, but if you think you’re not meeting your goals, consider adding a daily supplement to your routine.



September 5, 2014

Eating Fish Once A Week May Help Keep Your Brain Healthy

Filed under: Omega-3 — Emma @ 2:37 pm
Emma
Emma McGowan NatureCity author & contributor

As we age, our brains lose some of their structural integrity.  A recent study suggests that eating baked or broiled fish once per week may lower the risk of age-related grey matter loss in the brain.

Participants in the study included 260 cognitively normal adults over the age of 65. The researchers conducted blood tests and MRI of their brains.  Additionally, each participant filled out a food frequency questionnaire to determine fish intake. The researchers followed the participants for ten years, between 1989 and 1999.

At the conclusion of the study, the researchers found that participants who ate broiled or baked fish once a week had less loss of structural integrity compared to those who did not eat fish.  Specifically, they had 4.3% bigger grey matter volumes in the area of the brain responsible for memory and 14% bigger grey matter volumes in the area of the brain responsible for cognition. 

No brain health benefits were noted for fried fish. 

Researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on July 29, 2014, in American Journal of Preventative Medicine.

More and more research has shown us that fish consumption is extremely important to maintaining good health, especially as we age. Many of these studies have linked the positive health benefits of fish to their omega-3 fatty acid content. Omega-3 fatty acids have been associated with benefits ranging from improved heart health, better moods, improved joint mobility, and aiding your immune system.

If you don’t like the taste of fish or are concerned about the mercury levels that can be found in some fish, try adding a high quality supplement to your daily routine. Make sure, however, that your supplement has been tested for potency and purity in order to get the most out investment.



September 2, 2014

Eating More Omega 3 Rich Foods May Help Reduce Risk of ALS

Filed under: Omega-3 — Sarah @ 5:53 pm
Sarah
Sarah McGowan-Freije, NatureCity author & contributor

Amyotrophic later sclerosis (ALS) or Lou Gehrig’s disease was in the headlines recently as people posted videos of themselves dumping buckets of water on their heads in order to raise money and awareness about the incurable disease. In research news, a recent Harvard study suggests that eating foods with lots of omega- 3 fatty acids may lower the risk of developing ALS.

ALS is a severe progressive disease that cannot be prevented or cured. The disease attacks the nerve cells responsible for controlling voluntary muscles.

Participants in the study included over one million people who participated in five previously published studies. 995 ALS cases were documented during follow up periods that ranged from nine to 24 years. 

The researchers assessed diet via food frequency questionnaires and found that the median omega-3 fatty acid intake in men ranged from 1.40 to 1.85 grams daily and median omega-6 intake ranged from 11.82 to 15.73 grams daily. For women, the omega-3 intake ranged from 1.14 to 1.43 grams daily and omega-6 intake from 8.94 to 12.01 grams daily. 

After analyzing the data, the researchers found that the 20% of people who consumed the most omega-3 fatty acids were one third less likely to develop ALS when compared with the 20% who consumed the fewest omega-3 fatty acids. 

The study was published on July 14, 2014, in JAMA Neurology.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, better moods, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s. For vegans like the ones in this study or for folks who just don’t like fish, consider taking a daily high quality non-fish supplement that has been tested for purity and potency.



August 18, 2014

Eating Fish May Slow Cognitive Decline

Filed under: Omega-3 — Sarah @ 5:03 pm
Sarah
Sarah McGowan-Freije, NatureCity author & contributor

Memory loss is a natural part of human aging, but there are steps you can take to slow the process down. A recent study suggests that eating more fish may slow cognitive decline in adults over the age of 65.

Participants in the study included 1,566 people over the age of 55 who lived in China. The researchers assessed dietary intake via three day 24 hour recalls at the onset of the study. They then followed all of the participants for approximately five years.

At the conclusion of the study, the researchers found that there was no association between cognitive function and fish consumption for participants between the ages of 55 and 64. However, for those 65 and over, eating at least one serving (approximately 100 grams) of fish per week was associated with a difference in the annual rate of cognitive decline of 1.6 years, compared to those who ate less than one serving per week.

Researchers from the University of North Carolina and Duke University conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on July 30, 2014, in The Journal of Nutrition.

The results found here were probably due to the high omega-3 levels found in fish. Omega-3s have also been shown to improve inflammation, mood, joint mobility, age related macular degeneration, and the immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in DHA and EPA omega-3s.

If you don’t like fish or you’re worried about the high mercury levels found in some fish, consider taking a high quality supplement that has been tested for purity and potency.



July 28, 2014

The Omega-3 DHA May Aid People With Periodontitis

Filed under: Omega-3 — Emma @ 3:10 pm
Emma
Emma McGowan NatureCity author & contributor

Periodontitis (more commonly known as gum disease) is one of the most common diseases in the world and some studies report that between 30% and 50% of Americans suffer from it. A recent study suggests that taking a daily supplement of DHA omega-3 fatty acids may help improve the symptoms associated with periodontitis.

Participants in the study included 55 adults with moderate periodontitis who were given either 2,000 mg of DHA or a placebo of soy/corn oil every day for three months. Both the DHA and placebo group were given 81 mg of aspirin daily as well.

Out of the 46 people who completed the trial, DHA levels in red blood cell membranes increased from 3.6% to 6.2%. No increases were observed in the placebo group.

In regards to gum health, the DHA group had a decreased average depth in the pockets between the teeth and the gums. They also had a lower gingival index, which is the test used to assess how far periodontitis has progressed. Finally, inflammatory markers in the gum tissue of the DHA group were significantly reduced when compared to baseline and to the placebo group.

Researchers from Harvard University conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on June 26, 2014, in the Journal of Dental Research.

DHA is one of the two omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil; the other is EPA. Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, better moods, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s. For vegans like the ones in this study or for folks who just don’t like fish, consider taking a daily high quality non-fish supplement that has been tested for purity and potency.



July 24, 2014

Fish Oil May Slow Brain Shrinkage and Cognitive Decline

Filed under: Omega-3 — Emma @ 1:12 pm
Emma
Emma McGowan NatureCity author & contributor

People who are not genetically predisposed to Alzheimer’s disease may be able to conserve brain volume. A recent study suggests that taking fish oil supplements may prompt structural changes in the brain that conserve brain volume and improve cognition.

Participants in the study included 819 people who took part in the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. Of those participants, 229 were cognitively normal, 397 had mild cognitive impairment, and 193 had Alzheimer’s disease. Additionally, 117 of the participants reported regular fish oil supplement use.

The researchers conducted neuropsychological tests and brain MRIs every six months. They also compared cognitive functioning and brain atrophy for patients who reported taking fish oil supplements and those not taking fish oil supplements.

They found that taking a fish oil supplement was associated with better cognitive functioning during the duration of the study. That result was only seen for those participants with normal baseline cognitive function and for people who tested negative for AP0E4, the gene associated with Alzheimer’s disease.

Additionally, the participants who were APOE4 negative and took fish oil supplements had less brain atrophy than those who did not take fish oil.

Researchers from Brown University and Rhode Island Hospital conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on June 18, 2014, in the journal Alzheimer’s & Dementia.

Fish oil has also been linked to numerous other health benefits, including combating diabetes, lowering cholesterol, improving vision,reducing the risk of dementia and relieving depression.

If you’re looking to increase your fish oil intake, try adding darker fish, such as salmon or tuna, to your diet. If you don’t like the taste of fish or are just finding it hard to work it into your meal plans, consider taking a high quality supplement. Make sure your supplement is tested for purity and potency.



June 4, 2014

Omega-3s May Cut Risk of Venous Thromboembolism in Half

Filed under: Omega-3 — Emma @ 2:20 pm
Emma
Emma McGowan NatureCity author & contributor

Venous thromboembolism is a potentially deadly condition that occurs when a blood clot breaks loose and travels in the blood towards the lungs. A recent study suggests that consuming a combination of fish and fish oil supplements may lower the risk of venous thromboembolism by almost 50%.

Participants in the study included 23,621 people between the ages of 25 and 97 who were part of the Tromso population-based cohort. The researchers collected data over the course of an average 16 years, during which time 536 cases of venous thromboembolism were reported.

After analyzing the data, the researchers determined that participants who consumed three or more servings of fish per week had a 22% reduction in the risk of venous thromboembolism compared to those who consumed between 1 and 1.9 servings weekly.

When the participants who consumed three or more servings weekly also took fish oil supplements, the risk was 48% lower risk than those who ate 1 to 1.9 servings of fish weekly and did not take a fish oil supplement.

Researchers from the University of Tromso in Norway conducted the study. It was published in the June 2014 issue of The Journal of Nutrition.

Omega-3s have been linked to a number of health benefits, including improved joint mobility, helping with age related macular degeneration, better moods, and aiding your immune system.

Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s. For vegans like the ones in this study or for folks who just don’t like fish, consider taking a daily high quality non-fish supplement that has been tested for purity and potency.



May 7, 2014

Supplement May Help Ease PMS Symptoms

Filed under: Omega-3 — Emma @ 9:00 am
Emma
Emma McGowan NatureCity author & contributor

Women suffering every month from premenstrual syndrome may now find relief in a krill oil supplement. A recent study suggests that a supplement of krill oil, vitamins B1, B2, B6, soy isoflavones, and rosemary extract may significantly reduce symptoms of PMS.

Participants in the study included 29 women who took a daily supplement containing the above listed nutrients for three months. Symptoms decreased as the trial progressed, and the researchers noted maximum benefit from the supplement at the end of the research period.

Specific results included a decrease in overall anxiety by 70%, bloating by 69%, breast tenderness by 81%, skin outbreaks by 69%, cravings by 59%, fatigue by 60%, forgetfulness by 77%, insomnia by 62% and headaches by 70%.

PMS symptoms returned after the supplementation period was over.

Researchers from the School of Cancer Sciences at the University of Birmingham and Lifespan Essential Ltd. conducted the study. It was published on September 27, 2013, in Nutrition and Dietary Supplements.

Krill oil is rich in omega-3s, which have been linked to improved joint mobility, aiding your immune system, and helping with age-related macular degeneration. B vitamins have also been linked to numerous health benefits, including reducing breast cancer risk, nervous system function, red blood cell formation, and hormone function. Studies have also suggested that B vitamins may reduce the risk of hearing loss, and birth defects

Soy isoflavones may result in the widening of blood vessels and improvement in artery function. Additionally, soy isoflavones have been associated with reduced menopause symptoms, reduced bone loss, decreased risk of prostate cancer, improved bone health, cancer prevention and slowing down the aging process.



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