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Choline Associated With Decreased Risk of Dementia


Choline is an essential nutrient that is needed to produce acetylcholine, an important neurotransmitter for memory, mood, and muscle function. According to a new study, higher choline intake is associated with a lower risk of dementia and improved cognitive performance.





Participants in the study included 2,497 men between the ages of
42 and 60. All of them were dementia free at the beginning of the study. Dietary
intakes of choline were assessed using a 4-day food record. The main dietary
sources of choline were eggs and meat. After 4 years, 482 of the participants
completed 5 different cognitive performance tests.





The researchers found that participants with the highest dietary
intake of choline had a 28% decreased risk of developing dementia compared to
those with the lowest dietary intake. They also performed better on cognitive
tests, particularly in verbal fluency and memory functions.





The study was conducted by researchers from the University of
Eastern Finland. It was published online ahead of print on July 30, 2019 in the
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.


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