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Coffee and Tea Add-ins Increase Calorie Intake

Many people add sugar, cream or flavored syrups to their coffee and tea.  A recent study suggests that these add-ins account for approximately 69 extra calories per day.


Participants in the study included almost 20,000 people who took part in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. 13,185 of them reported drinking coffee and 6,215 reported drinking tea in the 24 hours previous to being surveyed.


After examining the data, the researchers found that people who drank black coffee consumed 69 fewer calories per day than those who added sweeteners, cream, or other substances to their coffee. Of those added calories, 60% came from sugar, while the remaining 40% came from fat.


People who drank tea added fewer heavy-calorie substances to their tea than coffee drinkers. For tea drinkers, there was an average increase of 43 calories, with 85% coming from sugar.


The researchers note that while the amounts are small, the cumulated effect of small amounts of extra calories per day can add up to pounds over time.


Researchers from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on January 26, 2017, in the journal Public Health.


Previous studies suggest that coffee may have multiple health benefits, which generally attributed to the powerful antioxidants found in coffee called polyphenols. These benefits include reducing the risk of developing diabetes, prostate cancer, cirrhosis and oral cavities.

Previous article Mango Polyphenols May Help Improve Inflammatory Bowel Symptoms

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