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Fiber Enriched Cookie May Help with Blood Sugar Management

In the US, 29 million adults have diabetes and 86 million have prediabetes. A recent study suggests that eating a cookie that contains resistant starch from potatoes may help people manage their blood sugar.


Participants in the study included 28 adults who had a mean body mass index between 18 and 29.9, a fasting glucose of less than 106 mg/dl, and no known physiological disorders or chronic diseases. Half of the participants were women and half were men.


On the first day of the study, participants ate a standard dinner meal. Fasting blood samples were taken the next day, after 12 hours of fasting. Then half of the group was given a fiber cookie made with 24 g of dietary fiber, while the other half was given a control cookie that matched for fat, protein, and total carbohydrate content. The participants switched interventions after a seven-day wash out period.


The researchers measured intravenous blood glucose, intravenous blood insulin, and capillary glucose for two hours after cookie consumption. They found that the fiber cookie was associated with a 44% reduction in post-prandial blood glucose, an 8% reduction in maximum glucose concentration, and a 46% reduction in post-prandial serum insulin, when compared with the control.


Researchers from Ingredion Incorporated conducted the study. It was published on March 5, 2017, in Nutrients.


Fiber consumption has also been linked with lowering total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol, and helping regulate blood sugar for people with diabetes.


There are two type of fiber: soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber can be found naturally in oats, peas, beans, apples, citrus fruits, carrots, barley and psyllium. Insoluble fiber can be found in whole wheat and grains, brown rice, fruit, broccoli, cabbage and dark leafy vegetables.

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