Skip to content
Flat Rate Shipping Only $6.95 on Any Order Size - and Always FREE for Club Members
Flat Rate Shipping Only $6.95 on Any Order Size - and Always FREE for Club Members

High Muscle Mass Linked to Reduced Risk of Cardiovascular Mortality

Cardiovascular disease is the number one killer in the United States, but how fit you are may help determine whether or not you die from it. A recent study suggests that people with cardiovascular disease and high muscle mass and low body fat are less likely to die than those with other body compositions.


Participants in the study included 6,451 people with cardiovascular disease that took part in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, which took place from 1999 to 2004. The participants were categorized into four groups;




    1. low muscle/low fat mass

    1. low muscle/high fat mass

    1. high muscle/low fat mass

    1. high muscle/high fat mass


The researchers found that people with high muscle mass and low fat mass had the lowest risk of cardiovascular mortality and of total mortality, when compared with the other three groups.


Researchers from the University of California, Los Angeles, conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on February 2, 2016, in The American Journal of Cardiology.


The best way to obtain high muscle mass and low body fat is through a combination of a balanced diet and regular exercise. Previous clinical studies suggest that even moderate exercise can reduce your risk of dying prematurely, help with blood sugar control, reduce body weight, improve heart health and improve respiratory health.

Previous article Fengureek Extract Shown to Increase Muscle Mass and Strength

Related Posts

Repetitive Negative Thinking May Increase Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease
Repetitive Negative Thinking May Increase Risk of Alzheimer’s Disease
Repetitive negative thinking is a style of thinking about one's problems or negative experiences that is repetitive, ...
Read More
Regular Physical Activity May Reduce Mobility Loss Risk
Regular Physical Activity May Reduce Mobility Loss Risk
Previous research has found that physical inactivity is the strongest predictor of loss of mobility in aging. A new s...
Read More
Study Finds Diabetes Increase Risk of Fractures
Study Finds Diabetes Increase Risk of Fractures
Diabetes can lead to a number of complications, including nerve damage, foot problems, heart disease, and high blood ...
Read More
×