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High Selenium Intake May Reduce Diabetes Risk

Harvard School of Public Health researchers have released a study suggesting that increasing selenium intake may significantly lower the risk of developing type-2 diabetes.

They determined this by analyzing the selenium levels in toenail clippings that were submitted as part of 2 long-term studies by more than 7,000 individuals in the 1980s.

The researchers found that the individuals with the highest levels of selenium in their toenails were 24% less likely to develop diabetes than the individuals with the lowest levels of selenium.

The study was published in the journal Diabetes Care on May 22, 2012.

Some foods rich in selenium are Brazil nuts, mushrooms, garlic, sunflower seeds, walnuts, raisins, pork and fish.

Selenium is an essential mineral that works as an antioxidant. Previous studies have shown that maintaining sufficient levels of selenium is important for reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease and immune dysfunction. Selenium is also the only mineral the FDA has approved for a qualified health claim for general cancer reduction incidence.

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