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Man Hungry Fasting Blood Sugar

Ketone Supplement May Help With Blood Sugar Spikes

Ketones are alternative fuel for the body when sugars are unavailable or in short supply, i.e. when a person is hungry. A recent study suggests that drinking a ketone supplement may help reduce blood sugar spikes.


Participants in the study included 20 healthy people who fasted for 10 hours before consuming a ketone drink or a placebo. They all took an oral glucose tolerance test half an hour after consuming the drink. Blood samples were collected every 15–30 minutes over a period of 2.5 hours.


The ketone acutely raised blood D-beta-hydroxybutyrate to 3.2±0.6 mm within 30 minutes, with levels remaining elevated throughout the entire oral glucose tolerance test. The ketone drink group also had an improved oral glucose sensitivity index when compared with the placebo, as well as a significant reduction in their blood sugar spike.


Researchers from the University of British Columbia, Okanagan, conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on February 15, 2018, in The Journal of Physiology.


 

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