Skip to content

Majority of College Football Players are Omega-3 Deficient

Research suggests that omega-3s may provide protection in the case of traumatic brain injury. However, a recent study suggests that the vast majority of college football players do not potentially protective levels of omega-3s in their blood, despite the very high risk of traumatic brain injury in that group.


Participants in the study included 112 NCAA Division 1 college football players. The researchers drew blood from all of the players and found that only one had an omega-3 index of 8%. That is the level that is considered to be best for cardiovascular and neuroprotective benefits. The mean omega-3 index for the players was 4.35%.


The researchers also noted that college football teams are not allowed to give players omega-3 supplements, as the NCAA is a food first organization.


Researchers from Texas Christian University conducted the study. It was presented in poster form at a meeting of the American College of Sports Medicine Conference in Minneapolis, MN held the week of May 29, 2018.


Because omega-3 fatty-acids are not found naturally in the human body, it is especially important to make sure that they are a part of your daily diet. Oily, dark fish such as tuna and salmon are high in omega-3s. For people who don’t like fish, consider taking a daily high quality non-fish supplement that has been tested for purity and potency.

Previous article Higher Levels of Plasma DHA Associated With Longer Sleep Duration in Teenagers

Related Posts

Study Finds Polyphenols May Help Improve Cognitive Function
Study Finds Polyphenols May Help Improve Cognitive Function
Polyphenols have antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties and are found in fruits, vegetables, spices, tea, dark ...
Read More
Account Creation on the New NatureCity.com
Account Creation on the New NatureCity.com
Transcript: Hello, my name is Jacob Geller and I'm a digital marketing strategist with NatureCity. Today I'm going to...
Read More
Six Tips to Help Manage High Blood Pressure From the American Medical Association
Six Tips to Help Manage High Blood Pressure From the American Medical Association
The American Heart Association defines high blood pressure as having systolic blood pressure between 130 and 179 and ...
Read More