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Breakfast Cereal Bowl Milk

Milk With Breakfast May Help Reduce Post-Meal Blood Glucose Concentration

Glucose control is important for overall health. A recent study suggests that consuming milk with breakfast cereal may help lower postprandial blood glucose concentration, when compared with water.


Participants in the study included 32 people with an average body mass index of 22.2 kg/m2. After a period of fasting, the participants consumed 2 servings of an oat-based cereal with 250 mL of milk with either 80:20 or 40:60 casein-to-why protein ratios at commercially normal (3.1%, wt) or high protein (9.3%, wt) concentration, or a control in the form of water with whey permeate. Blood glucose concentrations were measured with finger prick blood samples and appetite was assessed via visual analog scales.


The participants then consumed a pizza lunch 120 minutes after the test breakfast. The researchers also meaasured blood glucose and assessed appetite following lunch.


After examining the data, the researchers found that milk consumed with breakfast cereal reduced postprandial blood glucose concentration, when compared with water. They also found that dairy with high protein concentration reduced postprandial blood glucose concentration more than dairy with normal protein concentration. They also found that the high-protein concentration was associated with a reduced appetite after the second meal, when compared with the low-protein concentration.


Researchers from University of Guelph in Canada led the study. It was published online ahead of print on August 19, 2018, in the Journal of Dairy Science.


Whey protein is one of the two proteins found in milk, but it is only approximately 1% of the composition of milk. It is obtained as a byproduct of cheese making and can be purchased in powder form from health food stores. Additionally, it can be found in ricotta cheese, which is one of the only cheeses that do not have the whey removed.


When shopping for a whey protein, pay attention to the source of the milk, the production method, manufacturer specifications, and any added ingredients.


Casein is the other, more abundant, protein found in milk and has been linked in previous studies with building muscle and improved weight loss.

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