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New Research Suggests "There's No Such Thing As Too Much Vitamin E"

Recent studies have suggested that too much vitamin E intake is bad for your health, with some even claiming it can increase the risk of mortality. A new review of how vitamin E is metabolized, however, has discovered that the body actually excretes any excess vitamin E, meaning there is no such thing as too much vitamin E.

The researchers noted that the liver controls vitamin E levels in the body and that it excretes any amount that can’t be used on a regular basis. The only results noted from exceptionally high levels of vitamin E supplement consumption were a doubling of the tissue levels of vitamin E.

The researchers also noted that vitamin E’s interaction with vitamin K can cause some increase in bleeding but that this has not been shown to have a health risk thus far.

The biggest health risk associated with vitamin E, according to the researchers, is vitamin E deficiency, due to the many critical roles vitamin E plays in maintaining optimal health.

Researchers from the Linus Pauling Institute at Oregon State University conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on March 15, 2013, in the Journal of Lipid Research.

Vitamin E has been linked to lower cholesterol, healthier skin, maintaining a proper hormonal balance, and preventing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

If you’re looking to add more vitamin E to your diet, try eating more sunflower seeds, breakfast cereal, tomatoes, dried herbs, and dried apricots.

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