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Polyphenols Found to Help Improve Age-Related Memory Decline

Polyphenols are micronutrients packed with antioxidants that are found in fruits, vegetables, dry legumes, and chocolate. A recent study suggests that polyphenols from grapes and blueberries may help improve age-related memory decline in mature adults.

Two hundred fifteen adults between the ages of 60 and 70 participated in the study. They were given 600 mg of a polyphenol-rich extract from grape and blueberry or a placebo daily for 6 months. All the participants took cognitive tests that measured visuospatial learning, episodic memory, and verbal memory at baseline. The tests were administered again at the end of the study period.

All the participants in the polyphenol group saw improvements in verbal memory. Participants in the polyphenol group who had the most cognitive decline at baseline also had significant improvements in episodic memory. Specifically, their cognitive age improved by approximately 14 years, compared with 5.5 years in the placebo group.

The study was conducted by researchers from the University of Bourdeaux and Laval University. It was published on July 19, 2019 in The Journals of Gerontology: Series A.

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