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Probiotic May Help Reduce Weight Related Inflammatory Markers


A new study by researchers from Imagilin Technology and Restorasis Health at Sylvana Institute suggests that a probiotic strain of Pediococcus acidilactici may help reduce body fat and pro-inflammatory markers.





Participants in the study included 30 healthy adults. They were given either two capsules containing 4 billion CFU of the probiotic Pediococcus acidilactici or a placebo daily for three months. Percent body fat measurements and blood serum were taken at the beginning and end of the study. The blood serum was analyzed for inflammatory markers. The participants also completed questionnaires on gut function to evaluate how the probiotic was tolerated.





The researchers found that participants in the probiotic group lost an average of 0.86% body fat compared to a 0.28% increase in the placebo group. The probiotic group also had lower levels of the pro-inflammatory IL-6 and IL23 ratios. IL-6 is a marker of systemic inflammation, and IL23 is a marker of inflammation linked to obesity. The probiotic was well tolerated by all the participants.





The study was published on June 13, 2019 in Current Developments in Nutrition


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