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Robust Exercise Associated With Lower Risk of Heart Disease in Women

Robust Exercise Associated With Lower Risk of Heart Disease in Women

As you age, exercising on a regular basis can help you maintain a good quality of life. The best workouts for this are ones that help you build strength, stay mobile, and improve balance. According to a new study, women who exercise robustly have a significantly lower risk of dying from heart disease.

Participants in the study included 4,714 women with an average age of 64 with known or suspected coronary artery disease. They walked or ran on a treadmill, gradually increasing intensity until they reached exhaustion. They were placed into groups based on their exercise capacity, which was defined as the maximum amount of physical exertion they were able to sustain. All the participants were followed for an average of 4.6 years.

The researchers found that participants with a poor exercise capacity were four times as likely to die from cardiovascular disease as those with a good exercise capacity. Participants with poor exercise capacity were also twice as likely to die from cancer, and four times as likely to die from all causes.

The study was conducted by researchers from University Hospital A Coruña. It was presented on December 7th, 2019 at EuroEcho 2019.

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