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Sea Buckthorn Shown to Help Cholesterol Levels

A recent study suggests that taking sea buckthorn supplements may significantly reduce the risk of heart disease by improving cholesterol and blood lipid profiles.


For their analysis, researchers examined data from 11 independent randomized controlled trials that included a total of more than 900 participants. Five of the studies included healthy participants, three had people with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), and three were with people who had hyperlipidemia.


After examining the data, the researchers determined that sea buckthorn consumption was associated with significant decreases in total cholesterol and triacylglycerol, as well as significant increases in HDL cholesterol.


Researchers from Zhejiang University in China conducted the study. It was published in the March 2017 issue of Trends in Food Science & Technology.


Sea buckthorn is a shrub that has been used for centuries in traditional medicine. It is purported to have anti-inflammatory and anti-microbiological properties, and has been used for the treatment of skin diseases and digestive tract issues.


Previous studies have suggested that sea buckthorn may be effective in lowering cholesterol and blood pressure, regulating blood sugar and reducing the risk of diabetes and possibly even some cancers.

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