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Study Finds Women With Poor Sleep Quality Tend to Overeat

Not getting enough sleep has been previously linked to impaired immunity, increased risk of diabetes, respiratory problems, digestive issues, and mood changes. According to a new study, women who have poor sleep quality may be more likely to overeat and make unhealthy food choices.

For their study, the researchers looked at data from 495 women who participated in the AHA Go Red for Women prospective cohort study. They measured sleep quality and sleep-onset latency using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. Insomnia was measured using the Insomnia Severity Index. Diet quantity and quality were evaluated using the Block Brief Food Frequency Questionnaire.

The researchers found that women with poorer sleep quality tended to have lower unsaturated fat intake, and consumed bigger quantities, more added sugars, more caffeine, and less dairy. Women with sleep-onset latency above 60 minutes tended to consume bigger quantities, more calories, more caffeine, and less whole grains compared to women with sleep-onset latency below 15 minutes. Women with severe insomnia tended to consume bigger quantities, more calories, and less unsaturated fat.

The study was conducted by researchers from Colombia University. It was published online ahead of print on February 17, 2020 in the Journal of the American Heart Association.

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