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Policosanol Plus Vitamin K May Help Combat Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors

Cardiovascular diseases are the leading cause of death in most developed countries, and in many developing countries. A recent study suggests that taking a supplement that is a combination of policosanol derivative and vitamin K may help lower risk factors for cardiovascular disease.


Participants in the study included 6,595 people in Serbia. The group was divided into two, with 4,031 people receiving the policosanol/vitamin K supplement and 2,564 people acting as a control. The supplement group received a daily dose for three months and blood was drawn at the onset and conclusion of the study.


The supplement group was, on average, slightly older than the control group and both groups had more men than woman. In the supplement group, 55.6% were classified as obese, while the control group had lower levels of obesity. Smoking was prevalent in both groups, with 48% of the supplement group and 46% of the control identifying as smokers. The majority of participants in both groups had either a diagnosis of cardiovascular disease or risk factors. Hypertension was common in both groups and the majority of all participants were being treated with statins or other medications.


At the conclusion of the study, the researchers noted significant reductions in mean values of cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL cholesterol in the supplement group. They also noted an increase in mean value of HDL cholesterol in the supplement group, but significant decrease in the control group.


Researchers from Primary Health Center Vozdovac in Belgrade conducted the study. It was published in the February 2017 issue of the International Journal of Pharmaceutical Science Invention.


Policosanol is derived from sugar cane and is a relatively new substance. The research that has been performed suggests that it may help with cholesterol, but not much research has been performed as of yet.


Previous studies have linked vitamin K to bone and cardiovascular health, as well as a reduced risk of prostate cancer. Vitamin K comes in two main forms: K1 (phylloquinone) and K2 (menaquinones). Vitamin K1 is found in green leafy vegetables and makes up approximately 90% of the vitamin K consumption in a western diet.


Vitamin K2 is harder attain from food sources and therefore makes up only 10% of consumption. It is most common in fermented foods such as cheese but can also be found in meat and soybeans. Both vitamin K1 and K2 are also available in supplement form.

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