Skip to content
Taking More Steps Daily May Help Improve Blood Pressure

Taking More Steps Daily May Help Improve Blood Pressure

Making lifestyle changes such as losing weight, increasing activity, stopping smoking, and reducing stress is suggested to help improve blood pressure levels. According to a recent study, people who take more steps daily have lower average blood pressure than those who take less steps.

For their study, the researchers looked at data from 638 participants in the Framingham Heart Study. The participants wore Apple watches daily to track their number of steps, and recorded their blood pressure weekly. Participants were followed for 5 months.

Throughout the study, participants’ average systolic blood pressure was 122 mm HG and average diastolic blood pressure was 76 mm HG. Participants took an average of 7,500 steps per day. The researchers found that for every 1,000 steps taken daily, systolic blood pressure wsa approximately 0.45 points lower. This means that participants who took 10,000 steps daily would have a systolic blood pressure that is 2.25 points lower than those who took 5,000 steps daily.

The study was conducted by researchers from the University of California, San Francisco. It was presented at the 2020 American College of Cardiology's Annual Scientific Session Together with World Congress of Cardiology.

Previous article Avocados May Help Improve Focus in Obese Adults
Next article Omega-3 Supplementation May Help Reduce Urine Protein in Type 2 Diabetics

Related Posts

Black Seed Oil May Help Improve Blood Pressure
Black Seed Oil May Help Improve Blood Pressure
Black seed oil contains thymoquinone, which is an antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compound. A recent study suggests...
Read More
Being Physically Active May Help Decrease Time Spent in the Hospital
Being Physically Active May Help Decrease Time Spent in the Hospital
The Department of Health and Human Services recommends that adults do at least 150 minutes to 300 minutes per week of...
Read More
Physical Activity May Decrease Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in People With Metabolic Syndrome
Physical Activity May Decrease Risk of Cardiovascular Disease in People With Metabolic Syndrome
People with metabolic syndrome have an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. According to a recent study, even li...
Read More
×