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Ultra-Processed Foods Have Negative Affect On Cardiovascular Health

Ultra-Processed Foods Have Negative Affect On Cardiovascular Health

Ultra-processed foods go through multiple processes while being produced and have a lot of added ingredients. Foods in this category include soft drinks, chips, sweetened breakfast cereals, packaged soups, chicken nuggets, and hot dogs. According to a recent study, consumption of ultra-processed foods may negatively affect cardiovascular health.

Participants in the study included 13,446 adults who took part in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. They all filled out a 24-hour dietary recall questionnaire and provided information about their cardiovascular health.

The researchers found that the average American gets more than half of their daily calories from ultra-processed foods. Every 5% increase in calories from ultra-processed foods resulted in a decrease in cardiovascular health. People who got 70% of their calories from ultra-processed foods were 50% less likely to have ideal cardiovascular health compared to people who got 40% or less of their calories from ultra-processed foods.

The American Heart Association defines ideal cardiovascular health as having healthy blood pressure, cholesterol, and blood glucose levels, not using tobacco products, eating a healthy diet, maintaining a healthy body weight, and engaging in physical activity.

The study was conducted by researchers from the American Heart Association. IT was presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2019 held November 16-18, 2019 in Philadelphia.

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