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Cracked Walnut Half

Walnuts Shown To Improve Central Blood Pressure


Previous studies have found that central blood pressure, which is
the pressure in the ascending aorta, may be an indicator of the risk of future
cardiovascular events. According to a new study, walnuts may help improve
central blood pressure.





Forty-five overweight or obese people at risk for cardiovascular disease participated in the study. The participants consumed three comparable weight maintenance diets for six weeks each. The first diet included whole walnuts, the second included alpha-linolenic acid and polyunsaturated fatty acids without walnuts, and the third included oleic acid without walnuts. At the end of each diet period, the participants were assessed for several cardiovascular risk factors, including central systolic and diastolic blood pressure, brachial pressure, cholesterol, and arterial stiffness.





The researchers found that all three diets had a positive effect
on most of the cardiovascular risk factors. However, the walnut diet provided
the greatest benefits, including lower central blood pressure.





The study was conducted by researchers from Pennsylvania State University
and the University of Arizona. It was published online ahead of print on May 7,
2019 in the Journal of the American
Heart Association
.


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