Products
View All Products

Alotin HA
TrueOmega3
TrueLife PB

Powered by WordPress

December 19, 2014

Hypoglycemia in Diabetes May Lead to Cardiovascular Events

Filed under: Lifestyle — Sarah @ 5:13 pm
Sarah
Sarah McGowan-Freije, NatureCity author & contributor

A recent study suggests that diabetic patients who experience low blood sugar (also known as hypoglycemia) are at a higher risk of having a cardiovascular event and of dying from a cardiovascular event than those who do not experience low blood sugar.

The researchers used data from the UK Clinical Practice Research Datalink database. They found that people who experienced hypoglycemia were at a 60% higher risk of experiencing a cardiovascular event and were 2 to 2.5 times more likely to die than those who did not experience hypoglycemia.

They believe that this is because diabetics are at a higher risk of cardiovascular disease due to the formation of plaque in their blood vessels. Therefore, when their blood sugar drops, potentially fatal cardiovascular events can be triggered.

Researchers from the Imperial College London, the QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute and Novo Nordisk A/S conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on December 9, 2014, in Diabetes Care.

People with diabetes get hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) when their bodies do not have enough sugar to use as fuel. Several things can cause hypoglycemia, including diet and some medications. Certain medical conditions can also make hypoglycemia more common in people with diabetes. Exercise may also trigger hypoglycemia.



December 18, 2014

French Maritime Bark May Reduce Duration of Common Cold

Filed under: Pycnogenol — Emma @ 5:16 pm
Emma
Emma McGowan NatureCity author & contributor

Americans suffer 1 billion colds annually, which results in lost work hours every year. A recent study suggests that taking a daily supplement of French maritime pine bark (Pycnogenol®) may shorten the duration of the common cold as well as reduce the severity of sore throat, congestion, headache, coughing and sneezing.

Participants in the study included 146 people between the ages of 25 and 65, none of whom had taken a flu vaccination within three months of the beginning of the study. As soon as they started to show cold symptoms, 70 of the participants decided to take 100 mg of Pycnogenol® in addition to their usual cold treatments while the other 76 just followed their usual cold treatments.

Within four days of showing the first symptom, the Pycnogenol® group had an average 1.1 fewer days affected by cold and an average reduction of 0.12 days in the number of lost work days.

The researchers also noted that the Pycnogenol® group was less likely to ask for additional treatments such as nasal drops, aspirin plus vitamin C, antihistamines, and aerosols when compared with the control.

Researchers from Cheiti-Pescara University in Italy conducted the study. It was published in the December 2014 issue of Panminerva.

Pycnogenol® has been shown to help with high blood pressure, muscle soreness, osteoarthritis, diabetes, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, endometriosis, menopausal symptoms, ringing in the ears, erectile dysfunction and retinopathy.



December 17, 2014

Hyaluronan May Increase Skin Moisture and Improve Facial Signs of Aging

Filed under: Lifestyle — Emma @ 3:13 pm
Emma
Emma McGowan NatureCity author & contributor

Taking supplements of the high-viscosity macromolecular polymer hyaluronan (also known as hyaluronic acid) may increase skin moisture and improve luster and suppleness of the face in people with dry skin.

Participants in the study included 61 women aged 35 to 60 with dry skin. Over the course of six weeks they took either 120 mg of Hyaluronsan HA-F or Hyabest (S) LF-P or a placebo daily. Hyaluronsan HA-F has a molecular weight of 800k and Hyabest(S) LF-P has a molecular weight of 300k.

At the conclusion of the study, the researchers found that both hyaluronan groups showed improvements in skin moisture when compared with the placebo group. The group that took the Hyabest(S) LF-P showed the highest increases in skin moisture content, and the highest increase was recorded two weeks after the end of the ingestion period.

The participants filled out a questionnaire before ingestion began, after 3 and 6 weeks of ingestion, and 2 weeks after ingestion ended. Results of the questionnaires showed that subjective facial aging symptoms including luster, suppleness, and wrinkles were significantly improved in the HA groups when compared with the placebo.

The researchers noted no negative side effects on the skin in the HA groups.

Researchers from the Kewpie Corporation and Toho University Shashi Medical Center conducted the study. It was published online ahead of parting on November 1, 2014, in the Journal of Clinical Biochemistry and Nutrition.

Hyaluronan is found naturally throughout the body. Previous studies suggest that it may help provide relief for dry eyes and helps lubricate the joints, similar to the way that oil lubricates an engine.

Some foods that are good sources of hyaluronan are fish oil, vitamin C-rich fruits, and foods rich in magnesium such as broccoli, kale, avocados and carrots. You can also take a high quality supplement to increase your hyaluronan intake.



December 16, 2014

Second Generation Prebiotics May Help Lower Anxiety

Filed under: Probiotics — Emma @ 5:13 pm
Emma
Emma McGowan NatureCity author & contributor

According to the Mental Health Foundation, as many as one quarter of people in the western world will experience a mental health problem over any given 12 month period. A recent study suggests that taking supplements of a second generation prebiotics called galacto-oligosaccharides may lower anxiety, a common mental health problem.

Participants in the study included 45 people who took either fructooligosaccharides, Bimuno®-galactooligosaccharides or a placebo daily for three weeks. The researchers sampled salivary cortisol awakening response at the onset and end of the treatment period. On the last day of treatment, all of the participants completed a computerized task battery in order to assess the processing of emotionally significant information.

At the conclusion of the study, the researchers found that the Bimuno®-galactooligosaccharides group had significantly lower salivary cortisol response when compared to the placebo. Salivary cortisol response is used to measure hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal

The galactooligosaccharides group also showed lower attentional vigilance to negative versus positive information. Increased attention to negative information is one core functional marker of anxiety and depression.

No improvements were noted in the fructooligosaccharides group.

Researchers from the University of Oxford conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on December 3, 2014, in Psychopharmacology.

Galacto-oligosaccharides are called second generation prebiotics because they resist digestion by saliva and intestinal enzymes and arrive in the intestine basically intact. Previous studies suggest that second generation prebiotics may inhibit the growth of harmful bacteria, stimulate immune functions, and help with the absorption of essential nutrients and syntheses of certain vitamins.

If you’re looking to increase your galacto-oligosaccharides intake, consider taking a high quality supplement.



December 15, 2014

This Supplement Combination May Improve Memory, Mood, Cognitive Function in Mature Adults

Filed under: Uncategorized — Sarah @ 5:09 pm
Sarah
Sarah McGowan-Freije, NatureCity author & contributor

The results of two early pilot studies suggest that a combination of the supplements soy lecithin-derived phosphatidylserine (PS) and phosphatidic acid (PA) may help improve memory and cognitive function.

Participants in the first study included 72 functioning, non-depressive mature adults with memory problems. Over the course of three months they took three PS/PA capsules containing 300 mg PS and 240 mg PA in total or a placebo daily.

At the conclusion of the study, the researchers found that the PS/PA group had significant improvements in memory and reductions in “winter blues” when compared with the placebo group.

In the second study, 96 patients with Alzheimer’s disease were given the same PS/PA combination or a placebo for two months. At the conclusion of the study, the researchers noted significant stabilizing in daily functioning in the supplement group when compared with the placebo.

The supplement group showed 3.8% deterioration and 90.6% stability in daily functioning while the placebo group came in at 17.9% and 79.5%, respectively. Additionally, 49% of the PS/PA group reported improvements in general condition while only 26.3% of the placebo group reported the same. Lastly, 43% of the PS/PA group continued post-trial supplementation while none of the placebo group chose to do so. No negative side effects were observed

Researchers from Analyze & Realize GmbH in Germany conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print in Advances in Therapy on November 21, 2014.

PS is an essential component of all of our cells membranes, which are essentially the “shells” of our cells. It keeps the cells intact and moves nutrients into them and waste out.

Previous studies suggest that PS may help with declining mental function as well as alleviating depression. Others have found that it may help with thinking ability and improved memory.

PA is often used to increase the effects of strength training as well as improve mental acuity. It is believed that PA enhances the anabolic effects of resistance training.



December 12, 2014

Vitamin D May Reduce Incidence of COPD Flare-Ups

Filed under: Vitamin D — Emma @ 4:23 pm
Emma
Emma McGowan NatureCity author & contributor

People with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) often also suffer from vitamin D deficiency, which puts them at increased risk of upper respiratory infections and flare-ups of the ailment. A recent study suggests that taking vitamin D3 supplements may reduces flare-ups of COPD.

Participants in the study included 240 people with COPD living in and around London. Over the course of three months they were given two supplements per month of either 3mg of vitamin D or a placebo.

At the conclusion of the study, the researchers found that all participants in the vitamin D group had a modest reduction in severity and duration of symptoms regardless of their vitamin D levels at baseline. However, they noted that individuals who were vitamin D deficient at the beginning of the study showed greater reductions than those who started with adequate vitamin D levels.

Ultimately they found that vitamin D3 supplements protected against moderate or severe exacerbation but not upper respiratory infections in people with a baseline level of less than 50 nmol/L. They also found a reduction in flare ups of more than 40% in the participants who had low vitamin D at the onset of the study.

Researchers from Queen Mary University in London conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on December 2, 2104, in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine.

Previous studies have associated vitamin D with reducing the risk of skin damage, reducing the risk of osteoporosis, combating diabetes, and improving age related macular degeneration.

Vitamin D can be found in milk, fortified cereals, fish, and eggs. Your body also processes vitamin D from the sun but it becomes harder for our bodies to process it as we age. A high quality vitamin D supplement is always a good option if you feel that you’re not getting enough through diet and sun.



December 11, 2014

Obesity Linked to Shorter Life Expectancy

Filed under: Diet & Weight loss — Sarah @ 5:46 pm
Sarah
Sarah McGowan-Freije, NatureCity author & contributor

Being overweight or even obese is becoming increasingly common worldwide, and is resulting in an increase in obesity related diseases. Now a recent study has found that being overweight or obese could shorten a person’s lifespan by up to eight years.

For their study, researchers developed a disease-simulation model in order to estimate the annual risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and mortality for people with a BMI of 25-30 kg/m2(overweight), 30 – 35 kg/m2 (obese), and higher than 35 kg/m2 (very obese). For their model, they used data from 3,992 non-Hispanic white participants in the National Nutrition and Examination Survey, which took place from 2003 to 2010.

After validating their model projections, the researchers estimated the years of life lost and healthy life-years lost associated with each category. They found that the effect of excess weight on life lost was most noticeable in younger people and that it decreased with increasing age.

Specifically, obese men lost between 0 and 8 years of their lives if they were between the ages of 60 and 79 and 5 to 9 years if they were between the ages of 20 to 39. Very obese men lost between 0 and 9 years if they were between the ages of 60 and 79 and 7 to 10 years if they were between the ages of 20 and 39. Men who were just overweight showed smaller losses. Similar results were noted for women.

The researchers also found that healthy life-years lost were as much as two to four times higher than total years of life lost across all of the groups.

Researchers from McGill University conducted the study. It was published on December 5, 2014, in The Lancet Diabetes & Endocrinology.

Obesity has a far ranging negative effect on health. Each year, obesity causes approximately 300,000 premature deaths in the United States. The negative health effects associated with obesity include high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, osteoarthritis, metabolic syndrome and sleep apnea.

Improving eating habits and increasing physical activity play a vital role in preventing obesity. It is recommended that we eat five to six servings of fruits and vegetables per day. It also recommended that we get at least 30 minutes of moderate intensity activity every day.



December 10, 2014

Researchers Find Rise in Obesity-Related Cancers Worldwide

Filed under: Diet & Weight loss — Sarah @ 4:16 pm
Sarah
Sarah McGowan-Freije, NatureCity author & contributor

Previous studies have found that high body-mass index (BMI) is associated with an increased risk of cancer. A recent study looked further into this and found that a quarter of all obesity-related cancers in 2012 can be attributed to the rise in average BMI since 1982.

The researchers examined data from multiple sources, including the GLOBOCAN database of cancer incidence and mortality for 184 countries. They found that obesity-related cancer is more common in women than in men, which they attributed to endometrial and post-menopausal cancers.

In men, 136,000 or 1.9% of new cancers in 2012 could be attributed to excess weight while the number was 345,000 or 5.4% in women. Approximately 75% of the weight-related cancers in women were post-menopausal breast cancer, endometrial cancer, and colon cancer. In men, approximately 66% of the obesity-related cancers were colon and kidney cancers.

The researchers found that in developed countries, 8% of cancers in women and 3% of cancers in men were obesity-related, whereas those numbers were 1.5% and 0.3% in developing countries.

Regionally, North American accounted for 23% of all obesity-related cancers worldwide. Sub-Saharan Africa had the fewest, with 1.5%, and Eastern Europe accounted for more than a third of all obesity-related cancers in Europe.

There was also a large difference between countries. For example, the Czech Republic had a particularly high rate for men, with 5.5% of new cancers in 2012 attributed to obesity. Barbados had a particularly high rate for women – 12.7% – while countries in sub-Saharan Africa had the lowest for men (2%) and women (4%).

The researchers concluded that addressing obesity worldwide is important in order to curb the rise in incidences of cancer.

Researchers from the International Agency for Research on Cancer conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on November 26, 2014, in The Lancet Oncology.

Obesity has a far ranging negative effect on health. Each year, obesity causes approximately 300,000 premature deaths in the United States. The negative health effects associated with obesity include high blood pressure, diabetes, heart disease, osteoarthritis, metabolic syndrome and sleep apnea.

Improving eating habits and increasing physical activity play a vital role in preventing obesity. It is recommended that we eat five to six servings of fruits and vegetables per day. It also recommended that we get at least 30 minutes of moderate intensity activity every day.



December 9, 2014

Study Says Testosterone Therapy Does Not Increase Prostate Cancer Risk

Filed under: Lifestyle — Emma @ 7:18 pm
Emma
Emma McGowan NatureCity author & contributor

Hypogonadism is a condition characterized by low testosterone, erectile dysfunction, fatigue, depression, and unfavorable changes in body composition, such as weight gain despite regular exercise. Testosterone therapy is routinely used to treat hypogonadism, and a recent study has found that long-term testosterone therapy does not increase the risk of prostate cancer in men with hypogonadism.

Participants in the study included 1,023 hypogonadal men on testosterone therapy. The researchers did follow up for a median of approximately 5 years, and in some cases as long as 17 years. Cohort 1 consisted of 261 men while cohort 2 included 340 men. Both groups began being treated by urologists in 2004. Cohort 3 included 422 men who were treated at an academic andrology center starting in 1996.

By the conclusion of the study, there were six (2.3%) diagnoses of prostate cancer in cohort 1, five (1.5%) diagnoses in cohort 2, and none in cohort 3. Incidences of prostate cancer per 10,000 patient-years in cohorts 1 and 2 were 54.4 and 30.7, respectively. Those numbers are lower than the 116 incidences reported by the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian Screening Trial and the 96.6 reported by the European Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer.

The researchers concluded that properly applied testosterone therapy is safe for hypogonadal men.

Researchers from Bremerhaven, Germany, conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on June 26, 2014, in The Journal of Urology.

While testosterone levels decline naturally as men age, sometimes they can become too low. Low testosterone symptoms include low sex drive, erectile dysfunction, fatigue, hair loss and irritability. Blood test can confirm low testosterone levels.



December 8, 2014

Mediterranean Diet May Lead To Longer Life By Protecting Telomeres

Filed under: Food and Nutrition — Sarah @ 10:30 pm
Sarah
Sarah McGowan-Freije, NatureCity author & contributor

The Mediterranean diet is based on the diets of people who live in the Mediterranean part of the world. It contains high levels of omega-3 fatty acids, fruits, vegetables, nuts and whole grains but low levels of meats and saturated fats. A recent study suggests that following a Mediterranean diet may help people live longer by preventing damage to telomeres.

Telomeres are the protective “cap” on the end of chromosomes that protect them from unraveling. Damaged telomeres equal damaged DNA, which as been linked with shorter lifespans.

Participants in the study included 4,676 healthy women who took part in the Nurses’ Health Study, which started in 1976. The researchers used detailed food questionnaires to determine where on a scare of 0 to 9 points the women fell in terms of adherence to the Mediterranean diet. They also conducted blood tests to determine telomere length.

After examining the data, the researchers found that each one point change in diet score was associated with an average 1.5 years of telomere aging.

The researchers believe that these benefits can be credited to the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant qualities of the Mediterranean diet.

Researchers from Brigham and Young Women’s College and Harvard University conducted the study. It was published on December 2, 2014, in BMJ.

Previous research has shown that the Mediterranean diet may improve heart health, lower the risk of diabetes, asthma, lower rates of obesity and even decrease the overall risk of mortality.

The key components of the Mediterranean diet are eating primarily plant-based foods, replacing butter with olive oil, using herbs and spices instead of salt, eating red meat no more than a few times a month, eating fish and poultry at least twice a week.



Next Page »