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Drinking Tea Linked To Increased Bone Mineral Density

Low bone mineral density can lead to breaks, which are especially dangerous as we get older. A recent study suggests that drinking tea may help increase bone mineral density.


For their analysis, researchers examined data from 16 studies that included a total of 138,523 participants. Of the 16 studies, 4 were cross-sectional studies and 3 were cohort studies that looked at the association between tea consumption and bone mineral density. They found that increased bone mineral density was associated with tea consumption.


The other 9 studies examined tea consumption and incidence of fracture, and found no associations between the two. However, when the researchers omitted 2 outlying studies, they noted a statistically significant 23% reduction in fracture risk associated with tea consumption. The 2 outlying studies were found to be high-heterogeneity studies.


Researchers from China Academy of Medical Sciences conducted the study. It was published online ahead of print on March 3, 2017, in Nutrition Research.


Tea contains a high level of strong antioxidants called polyphenols. These compounds protect our cells from dangerous free radicals. In fact, an earlier study found that the cells of regular tea drinkers actually have a younger biological age than non-tea drinkers.


Polyphenols have been shown to promote weight loss, improve heart health, aid in digestion and decrease the risk of neurodegenerative diseases. Previous studies have shown that tea brewed at home contains higher levels of polyphenols than tea purchased in a bottle. Additionally, packaged teas tend to contain preservatives, sugar and other ingredients that may neutralize the health benefits of tea.

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