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Hot Yoga May Help Improve Blood Pressure


Hot yoga is a vigorous form of yoga that is performed in a very warm
and humid setting, resulting in considerable sweating. A new study suggests
that hot yoga may help improve blood pressure in people with elevated blood
pressure or stage 1 hypertension.





Ten people between the ages of 20 and 65 participated in the
study. All of the participants had elevated blood pressure or stage 1
hypertension and were not taking any blood pressure medication. They had also
been sedentary for at least 6 months.





Half of the participants took hour long hot yoga classes three
times per week for a period of 12 weeks. The other half did not take any yoga
classes. Blood pressure measurements were taken at baseline and at the end of
12 weeks. The researchers also measured perceived stress.





For participants in the hot yoga group, systolic blood pressure
dropped from an average 136 mmHg to 121 mmHg. Diastolic blood pressure also
dropped, from an average 82mmHg to 79 mmHg. No changes in blood pressure were
seen in the group that did not do hot yoga. In addition, perceived stress
levels decreased in the hot yoga group.





The study was conducted by researchers from Texas State
University. It was presented at the American
Heart Association's Hypertension 2019 Scientific Sessions
on September 5,
2019.


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