Skip to content
Flat Rate Shipping Only $6.95 on Any Order Size - and Always FREE for Club Members
Flat Rate Shipping Only $6.95 on Any Order Size - and Always FREE for Club Members
Microvascular Endothelial Dysfunction Associated with Increased Risk of Cancer

Microvascular Endothelial Dysfunction Associated with Increased Risk of Cancer


Microvascular dysfunction is a type of non-obstructive coronary artery disease that causes the small blood vessels feeding the heart muscle to not work as they should and is an early sign of cardiovascular disease. A new study has found that microvascular endothelial dysfunction may be associated with a two-fold increased risk of solid-tumor cancer.





The researchers looked at the data for 488 people who were assessed for microvascular endothelial dysfunction between 2006 and 2014. Of those, 221 were diagnosed with microvascular endothelial dysfunction, meaning they had a tonometry index at or below 2. All the participants were followed for an average of 6 years.





During the follow-up period, 9.7% of the participants previously diagnosed with microvascular endothelial dysfunction were diagnosed with solid-tumor cancer. In comparison, only 3.7% of the participants diagnosed as not having microvascular endothelial dysfunction were diagnosed with solid-tumor cancer. These findings held even after adjusting for age, sex, diabetes, hypertension, and smoking status.





The study was conducted by researchers from the Mayo Clinic. It was published online ahed of print on October 31, 2019 in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology.


Previous article Fengureek Extract Shown to Increase Muscle Mass and Strength

Related Posts

Supplement Combination May Help Improve Working Memory
Supplement Combination May Help Improve Working Memory
Bacopa is a perennial herb that has long been used in Ayurveda, the traditional medicine of India. American ginseng i...
Read More
Physical Activity May Help Women Maintain Muscle Mass After Menopause
Physical Activity May Help Women Maintain Muscle Mass After Menopause
Menopause is associated with a natural decline in estrogen, which often leads to increases in visceral fat mass, and ...
Read More
Reducing Sodium May Help Improve Blood Pressure and Increase Short-Chain Fatty Acids
Reducing Sodium May Help Improve Blood Pressure and Increase Short-Chain Fatty Acids
Short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) are produced by beneficial bacteria in your microbiome and they’re essential for your ...
Read More
×